Meteorites

Meteorites, with all their mystery and drama, have been found on every continent on Earth and in countries all over the world. Argentina, Morocco, Sweden and Oman, each have their own strewn fields to explore and collect from. Often these collected specimens make it to auction and bring handsome returns. Though prices realized can vary depending on specimen size and locality, larger specimens have been known to be sold for between $30,000-50,000 US with some gaining considerably more than that.

The three Meteorites listed below come from Australia, Russia and Siberia respectively.

Deleted: Alex Galesic

  • Clocks & Musical Instruments
  • Natural History

Meteorites, with all their mystery and drama, have been found on every continent on Earth and in countries the world over. Often times these collected specimens make it to auction and bring handsome returns.


Each was collected by private individuals and each sold at auction for around $5,000. Not bad for a little walking and keeping a close eye on the ground.

On 28 September 1969 at about 10:58 AM, a fireball was seen entering earth’s atmosphere and exploding into three fragments strewn over an 8 1/2 mile area. Murchison meteorites are rich in carbon and with over 100 amino acids already identified within collected samples, they have transformed science’s thinking on the nature and origin of organic materials.

On FEB. 12, 1947 at about 10:30AM, 80 tons of burning iron mass was seen speeding through the earth’s atmosphere at 8.7 miles per second. It then violently exploded 3 1/2 miles above the Sikhote-Alin Mountains and scattered elliptically over an area of about half a mile.


Individual Sikhote-Alin specimens often contain the prized Regmalypts, which are telltale thumbprints indicating intense friction heating followed by quick cooling in Earth’s atmosphere.

Originating in the Asteroid belt, Canyon Diablo Meteorite was part of a meteorite that had entered Earth’s atmosphere approximately 40,000 years ago. The main mass vaporized with the force of 100 atomic bombs leaving a crater one mile wide and 600 feet deep. Though fragments fell more than 11 miles away, many specimens were collected near the crater rim.